Guest Post: Multimedia – Breaking the Resume Mold in the 21st Century

Qualified candidates are regularly overlooked, and for the simplest of reasons: they didn’t plug the right combo of buzzwords into their resumes. Candidates are taking things into their own hands. In an attempt to circumvent the keyword-laden resume game, job seekers are adopting a more creative approach to captivating recruiters. Rather than dropping the resume altogether, the trend seems to be more focused on breaking away from over-automation and a return to the heart of what makes a good hire.

Laurie Barkman of The Resumator explains, “We’ve been told for a long time, ‘This is how you do recruiting, and here’s what matters,’ but organizations are now more interested in interactions that help to determine a good fit. And more nimble organizations are looking at people beyond the resume.”

All of that sounds nice, sure, but what’s working and what’s not? There are certain guidelines that you should always follow when submitting a resume regardless of mode of delivery, but are candidates simply covering up mistakes with aesthetics? If you ask me, resumes and the mulitmedia techniques being used are essentially marketing tools–and the function they serve isn’t changing. As Barkman states, “The question you have to ask yourself is, ‘Can multimedia enhance that message?’” If the answer is yes, there are four channels a candidate can tap into to accomplish this:

1.    Adding a Face and Voice with Video. By replacing a cover letter with a quick video pitch, job seekers can showcase skills and abilities lost in translation in a traditional resume. As Bruce Hurwitz of Hurwitz Strategic Staffing says, “Video can increase my confidence in a candidate’s ability to successfully interview–Is she professional? Is she articulate?–or eliminate a candidate from consideration.” Of course, time is money, and candidates need to give recruiters a reason to keep watching. My advice: personality is great, but don’t get too cute. Balance is key.

2.    Bringing Flat Resumes to Life with Infographics. Breaking out of the traditional resume template isn’t easy without a degree in design. But presenting a recruiter with a more visually stimulating overview of experience and qualifications can go a long way in setting a candidate apart. Thankfully, it doesn’t take an Adobe Illustrator savant to turn a boring old resume into an interesting infographic. Not only are these easy to create, but they’re easy to share across multiple channels.

3.    Showing Off on Personal Blogs. Blogs are an excellent platform for candidates to showcase their hobbies, writing and communication skills, and general interests. Think they’re just for marketing candidates? Think again. Even a meat cutter at Whole Foods can run a successful butcher blog to establish expertise and share experience with an avid audience. And candidates for and candidates for artistic positions can showcase their portfolio of work.

About the Author: Kyle Lagunas is the HR Analyst at Software Advice, a resource for selecting a talent management or an applicant tracking system. Kyle reports on trends and best practices in HR and recruiting software—offering fresh insights into the ho-hum of people processes. For further reading, you can find this article in full on his HR blog.

The Entrepreneur Age is Limitless!

entrepreneur, startup, "job search", entrepreneurship, "business dveelopment", "small business"

I recently read an article in the NY Times talking about how the job market for teens this summer was limited.

I remember thinking about summer jobs. In my family we had one car growing up. I know that sounds almost crazy in this day and age! That issue, however, created some challenges in my job search. For example, the nearest mall was about 30 miles away (another crazy thought in this day and age; being 30 miles away from a mall!) so working in retail was not an option. But, if I wanted to buy the stuff I needed as a teenager (clothes and music) I needed to find a job. I turned to babysitting. Now that I think back to it I see so many similarities to starting my own business as an adult. I leveraged my parents to reach out to their friends (networking) and started from word of mouth. Pretty soon I had my regular families that I would work for. I also landed a work-study job after school to supplement the babysitting income.

I think this is the perfect time for our teens to go out and create work for themselves. There is plenty of opportunity around our communities; we just need to be a little creative. In our neck of the woods we need kids that would cut the grass or weed gardens. The average price to have your grass cut is about $35/yard. A teenager could charge $20-$25 and get most yards done within 1-2 hours. Kids can make a good hourly wage and then if they do a good job build their network and bring on new clients. There are many opportunities out there: Walking dogs, yard work, painting, etc. The key is to identify the needs within the community and then offer those services. Young families are busier than ever and any chance to get some help is greatly appreciated. Summers are so busy that I know I would love and extra pair of hands around for these odd jobs.

So leverage this opportunity to develop your business skills and get out there and have some fun. The kicker: You will make some money at it too!

Photo credit: fooyoh.com

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part V

When many college graduates begin their job search, they often wonder “what do I wear to the interview?” It might seem tricky if the company you’re going into is business casual. If the company dress is conservative or business casual, always dress up!Classic shoes

We realize that on a college budget, graduates might have a limited number of suit or dress pieces for an interview. We put together some different interview outfit looks on Ashley, by mixing and matching different accessories to key items in the outfit. This is the best method for any college student to create many interview outfits for less!

Some key items to mix around are:

  • necklaces or scarves with a suit coat
  • blazer or cardigan over a dress
  • classic colored heels with any outfit

For Ashley’s makeup, we used lightweight mineral foundation and blush. For any interview, you want to look natural. To get this natural look, keep the eye shades neutral colored: light pinks, browns, beiges, etc. A brown pencil eyeliner was applied lightly on her top lid, along with brownish/black mascara. We gave Ashley a comfortable and refreshed look for her interview.

Don’t forget the biggest key accessories with your interview outfit…your resume, portfolio, and questions! Good luck!

Ashley's Finished Interview Look

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part I

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part II

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part III

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part IV

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part VI

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part IV

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part I

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part II

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part III

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part V

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part VI

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part III

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part I

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part II

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part IV

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part V

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part VI

How to Land a Job After Graduation- Part II

I’m Ashley Dingeman, a senior Communication major at SUNY Geneseo. I am currently working as the marketing intern for Whiting Consulting, and with only 47 days until commencement, I am one of many considered to be “an active job seeker.”

With broad major like Communications, I have a plethora of potential professions I would be qualified for. My issue then? Narrowing down what it specifically is that I want to do. On top of that, my growing anxiety is getting the best of me regarding my personal interview techniques, my preparedness for the job world, and the pressure of finding a job in this economy.

You always hear people say that what you learn in college is going to prepare you for the rest of your life. Well, I would have to disagree. Although I have grown as a person and my knowledge has significantly matured, I can’t say that I have been prepped by college for the next stage in my life. I, unlike most students, was fortunate enough to take a class specifically geared toward preparing students for the job hunt. In turn, I was forced to perfect my resume, learn to write a cover letter, create a portfolio, and perform a number of mock interviews.

One thing this class was missing was helping me to pinpoint what I want to do with my life after graduation.  I’m the type of person who has tried many jobs, always loves doing something new, and isn’t afraid of commitment. One of my many passions is food, whether it’s cooking, eating, watching others cook, reading, or writing about it.  Simplified: I would categorize myself as a foodie.

I think to love something so much and to be so intrigued by it qualifies it as a passion. For some, eating is eating and food is food, but to me, it’s so much more. In my perfect world, I would love to do all of the above, cook, eat, watch, read, and most importantly, write. But my world isn’t perfect, and I have to be understanding that my dream job isn’t going to come to me as an entry level position.

In order to stand out from the rest, I’ve been consciously using social media to brand myself and to be heard. Over the next few weeks prior to graduation, my social media profiles will be evaluated and picked apart by the Whiting Consulting professionals, and they will be restructuring them from a college student’s profiles to what employers want to see. This process may not be glamorous, but it’s something that all current graduates should be doing.

Please join me and come along for the ride, learn from my mistakes, and gain these competitive advantages over your peers. You’ll never be more thankful than when you hear those two powerful words from your future employer’s mouth saying, “You’re hired!”

Post written by Ashley Dingeman, Marketing Intern at Whiting Consulting.

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part I

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part III

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part IV

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part V

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part VI

How to Land a Job After Graduation- Part I

With college graduation fast approaching, I thought I would create a series blog for the Class of 2011 and any other recent college graduate job seeker in their quest to land a job after graduation. For the series, we’re taking our intern’s real-life experiences, personal brand, and social media profiles and transforming them to deliver top results for what is found online by job seekers and what hiring managers are looking for in a top candidate. Join us in our journey of helping college grads transform into top notch candidates and how to properly approach the current job market.

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part II

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part III

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part IV

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part V

How to Land a Job After Graduation: Part VI

‘Managing Forward’ Series Part III: Advice for Interns

The final video of Chip’s interview focuses on what managers look for in today’s young professionals.

It is important for every intern going into a new role to learn and discover what they need to bring to the table to benefit the employer and themself. From Chip’s six years of managing college students, there are some main points he touches upon in the video:

1.      Top-notch qualities needed for post-graduation employment.

2.      Attributes sought out in an intern.

3.      Purpose of an interview.

What are some other attributes that an intern needs to be successful?


Guest Post: Will 2011 Bring Better Advice for Jobseekers Without Degrees?

Looking for advice on how to get a job if you don’t have a college degree?jobseeker, job search

Google’s front page may not provide the answers depending on your search terms.

“Nearly 60 percent of American jobs now require at least a bachelor’s degree, according to Help Wanted: Projections of Jobs and Education Requirements Through 2018, a June 2010 report released by the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.” Source

Anyone who does not have a degree and is looking for a job may feel his or her first resort is retail, food service, or customer service. Those who are not suited for these professions, though, want and deserve good instruction on how to get started in a career that they are passionate about. When society expects more from people, people give more, but they have to know the steps to get there first.

The top search listings on Google’s front page that relate to finding a job without a degree or advice for non-graduates is narrow-minded at best. Their top five highest paying occupations without a college diploma are as follows:

1. Air Traffic Controller

2. Funeral Director

3. Operations Manager

4. Industrial Production Manager

5. Transportation Manager

And the “advice” they list include:

1.       Go back to school when your lack of education becomes a roadblock.

2.       [When preparing your resume when you don’t have a degree], don’t list education at all.

Other articles list the top 20 jobs for people without degrees, but they all have the same thing in common; they are all under the label of high-paying jobs.

But can someone in their twenties with scant experience garner a position as an air traffic controller?  Can they obtain a management position without prior experience in management?

Not many of the articles offer advice on how to start a career that leads toward these high-paying positions. As a non-graduate with years of experience in positions that showcase transferable skills, I would like to see greater attention paid to the following challenges of finding a job when you have no degree:

1.       Many people simply cannot afford to go back to school.

2.       How to work around how applicant tracking systems handle degrees with no resumes.

3.       How to garner entry-level jobs that lead to these high paying roles.

What I certainly don’t want to see is an article that claims you don’t need a degree to be a transportation manager only to find another article that says you do.

“If you plan to become a transportation manager in the United States, you will usually need to have earned a bachelor’s degree.” Source

What is your experience with searching for advice as a non-graduate trying to start their career?

The author, Chanelle Schneider, runs There From Here where she writes on career and life advice for Generation Y with a specific focus on those older GenY’ers who have yet to graduate from college. Known as @WriterChanelle on Twitter, she also writes for the Examiner.com as the DC Social Media Examiner, is the founder of the generational chat #GenYChat and manages the @GenYChat account.

Photo credit: aami.org/career

Become the Shining STAR in Your Applicant Pool


Ever been asked the typical interview question: “Tell me about yourself?”

Where do you even start!?
There’s so much to tell, with your mind about to explode with all of the different experiences and skill sets you have to offer. Sorting these ideas can be overwhelming right on the spot when those precious interview seconds are wasting away…

My last semester of college before I started my road to job searching, I learned the STAR technique in my Human Resource class and also heard it again from a career counselor in an interview workshop. Instead of spilling out your whole life story at the beginning of an interview, use the STAR method to set yourself apart from the other candidates. Continue reading

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